Release of Conduct This! Game Music Soundtrack

The Game, Conduct This! Began as a mobile app game created by a small indie studio in Copenhagen called Northplay. The game, inspired by railway games from the 90s, with low poly maps that’s addictive. It’s a puzzle game where you are conducting / managing a train system so that there are as few accidents as possible.

Many reviewers celebrated the graphics, calling it gorgeous and the music outstanding and that the controls are incredibly simple and intuitive, and the puzzles themselves are challenging. My Music, Northplay, wanted me to be inspired by old games from the 90s and Big Band Jazz. A fun task to tackle.

Soon the game became a hit and it won awards on some of the biggest possible award shows for games. Millions upon millions downloaded the app and Northplay started to create more games in what would become a series of games for different platforms surround Conducting trains. Also, an AR version with the focus on Western movies, a collaboration game and a game for the platform STEAM.

Many have asked me to release the Music so here we go. It is now released digitally all over the world. Check it out on places like Spotify, Apple/Itunes, Google Play, Amazon, Deezer, Tidal, You can also get it/listen to it at: TikTok, Napster, IHeartRadio, ClaroMusica, Saavn, Anghami, KKbox, MediaNet and even more places. For you in the US the album can also be found on Pandora.

Ave Mater score released by MovieScore Media

I have been a fan of MovieScore Media for a while now so it’s a very good feeling to be released on that great label. Ave Mater (Vilsen) is a score I am very proud of. Click HERE to go to MovieScore Medias page about the score.

Composing the score meant me setting out on a journey to create something dark, exciting and filled with suspense, but not horror. Rasmus was rather clear that he felt that the music should be the ‘beating heart and soul of the film’, a true guide throughout the story. To work with a couple of clear themes got important with the choir and the cello became crucial to capture the feeling of the occult.